Node.js Markdown to JSX Converter For React.js Applications Using markdown-to-jsx Library Using TypeScript Full Project For Beginners

 

 

 

markdown-to-jsx

The most lightweight, customizable React markdown component.

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markdown-to-jsx uses a heavily-modified fork of simple-markdown as its parsing engine and extends it in a number of ways to make your life easier. Notably, this package offers the following additional benefits:

  • Arbitrary HTML is supported and parsed into the appropriate JSX representation without dangerouslySetInnerHTML
  • Any HTML tags rendered by the compiler and/or <Markdown> component can be overridden to include additional props or even a different HTML representation entirely.
  • GFM task list support.
  • Fenced code blocks with highlight.js support.

All this clocks in at around 5 kB gzipped, which is a fraction of the size of most other React markdown components.

Requires React >= 0.14.

Installation

Install markdown-to-jsx with your favorite package manager.

npm i markdown-to-jsx

Usage

markdown-to-jsx exports a React component by default for easy JSX composition:

ES6-style usage*:

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

render(<Markdown># Hello world!</Markdown>, document.body);

/*
    renders:

    <h1>Hello world!</h1>
 */

NOTE: JSX does not natively preserve newlines in multiline text. In general, writing markdown directly in JSX is discouraged and it’s a better idea to keep your content in separate .md files and require them, perhaps using webpack’s raw-loader.

Parsing Options

options.forceBlock

By default, the compiler will try to make an intelligent guess about the content passed and wrap it in a <div><p>, or <span> as needed to satisfy the “inline”-ness of the markdown. For instance, this string would be considered “inline”:

Hello. _Beautiful_ day isn't it?

But this string would be considered “block” due to the existence of a header tag, which is a block-level HTML element:

# Whaddup?

However, if you really want all input strings to be treated as “block” layout, simply pass options.forceBlock = true like this:

<Markdown options={{ forceBlock: true }}>Hello there old chap!</Markdown>;

// or

compiler('Hello there old chap!', { forceBlock: true });

// renders

<p>Hello there old chap!</p>;

options.forceInline

The inverse is also available by passing options.forceInline = true:

<Markdown options={{ forceInline: true }}># You got it babe!</Markdown>;

// or

compiler('# You got it babe!', { forceInline: true });

// renders

<span># You got it babe!</span>;

options.wrapper

When there are multiple children to be rendered, the compiler will wrap the output in a div by default. You can override this default by setting the wrapper option to either a string (React Element) or a component.

const str = '# Heck Yes\n\nThis is great!'

<Markdown options={{ wrapper: 'article' }}>
  {str}
</Markdown>;

// or

compiler(str, { wrapper: 'article' });

// renders

<article>
  <h1>Heck Yes</h1>
  <p>This is great!</p>
</article>
Other useful recipes

To get an array of children back without a wrapper, set wrapper to null. This is particularly useful when using compiler(…) directly.

compiler('One\n\nTwo\n\nThree', { wrapper: null });

// returns

[
  (<p>One</p>),
  (<p>Two</p>),
  (<p>Three</p>)
]

To render children at the same DOM level as <Markdown> with no HTML wrapper, set wrapper to React.Fragment. This will still wrap your children in a React node for the purposes of rendering, but the wrapper element won’t show up in the DOM.

options.forceWrapper

By default, the compiler does not wrap the rendered contents if there is only a single child. You can change this by setting forceWrapper to true. If the child is inline, it will not necessarily be wrapped in a span.

// Using `forceWrapper` with a single, inline child…
<Markdown options={{ wrapper: 'aside', forceWrapper: true }}>
  Mumble, mumble…
</Markdown>

// renders

<aside>Mumble, mumble…</aside>

options.overrides – Override Any HTML Tag’s Representation

Pass the options.overrides prop to the compiler or <Markdown> component to seamlessly revise the rendered representation of any HTML tag. You can choose to change the component itself, add/change props, or both.

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

// surprise, it's a div instead!
const MyParagraph = ({ children, ...props }) => (
    <div {...props}>{children}</div>
);

render(
    <Markdown
        options={{
            overrides: {
                h1: {
                    component: MyParagraph,
                    props: {
                        className: 'foo',
                    },
                },
            },
        }}
    >
        # Hello world!
    </Markdown>,
    document.body
);

/*
    renders:

    <div class="foo">
        Hello World
    </div>
 */

If you only wish to provide a component override, a simplified syntax is available:

{
    overrides: {
        h1: MyParagraph,
    },
}

Depending on the type of element, there are some props that must be preserved to ensure the markdown is converted as intended. They are:

  • atitlehref
  • imgtitlealtsrc
  • input[type="checkbox"]checkedreadonly (specifically, the one rendered by a GFM task list)
  • olstart
  • tdstyle
  • thstyle

Any conflicts between passed props and the specific properties above will be resolved in favor of markdown-to-jsx‘s code.

Some element mappings are a bit different from other libraries, in particular:

  • span: Used for inline text.
  • code: Used for inline code.
  • pre > code: Code blocks are a code element with a pre as its direct ancestor.

options.overrides – Rendering Arbitrary React Components

One of the most interesting use cases enabled by the HTML syntax processing in markdown-to-jsx is the ability to use any kind of element, even ones that aren’t real HTML tags like React component classes.

By adding an override for the components you plan to use in markdown documents, it’s possible to dynamically render almost anything. One possible scenario could be writing documentation:

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

import DatePicker from './date-picker';

const md = `
# DatePicker

The DatePicker works by supplying a date to bias towards,
as well as a default timezone.

<DatePicker biasTowardDateTime="2017-12-05T07:39:36.091Z" timezone="UTC+5" />
`;

render(
    <Markdown
        children={md}
        options={{
            overrides: {
                DatePicker: {
                    component: DatePicker,
                },
            },
        }}
    />,
    document.body
);

markdown-to-jsx also handles JSX interpolation syntax, but in a minimal way to not introduce a potential attack vector. Interpolations are sent to the component as their raw string, which the consumer can then eval() or process as desired to their security needs.

In the following case, DatePicker could simply run parseInt() on the passed startTime for example:

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

import DatePicker from './date-picker';

const md = `
# DatePicker

The DatePicker works by supplying a date to bias towards,
as well as a default timezone.

<DatePicker
  biasTowardDateTime="2017-12-05T07:39:36.091Z"
  timezone="UTC+5"
  startTime={1514579720511}
/>
`;

render(
    <Markdown
        children={md}
        options={{
            overrides: {
                DatePicker: {
                    component: DatePicker,
                },
            },
        }}
    />,
    document.body
);

Another possibility is to use something like recompose’s withProps() HOC to create various pregenerated scenarios and then reference them by name in the markdown:

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';
import withProps from 'recompose/withProps';

import DatePicker from './date-picker';

const DecemberDatePicker = withProps({
    range: {
        start: new Date('2017-12-01'),
        end: new Date('2017-12-31'),
    },
    timezone: 'UTC+5',
})(DatePicker);

const md = `
# DatePicker

The DatePicker works by supplying a date to bias towards,
as well as a default timezone.

<DatePicker
  biasTowardDateTime="2017-12-05T07:39:36.091Z"
  timezone="UTC+5"
  startTime={1514579720511}
/>

Here's an example of a DatePicker pre-set to only the month of December:

<DecemberDatePicker />
`;

render(
    <Markdown
        children={md}
        options={{
            overrides: {
                DatePicker,
                DecemberDatePicker,
            },
        }}
    />,
    document.body
);

options.createElement – Custom React.createElement behavior

Sometimes, you might want to override the React.createElement default behavior to hook into the rendering process before the JSX gets rendered. This might be useful to add extra children or modify some props based on runtime conditions. The function mirrors the React.createElement function, so the params are type, [props], [...children]:

import Markdown from 'markdown-to-jsx';
import React from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

const md = `
# Hello world
`;

render(
    <Markdown
        children={md}
        options={{
            createElement(type, props, children) {
                return (
                    <div className="parent">
                        {React.createElement(type, props, children)}
                    </div>
                );
            },
        }}
    />,
    document.body
);

options.slugify

By default, a lightweight deburring function is used to generate an HTML id from headings. You can override this by passing a function to options.slugify. This is helpful when you are using non-alphanumeric characters (e.g. Chinese or Japanese characters) in headings. For example:

<Markdown options={{ slugify: str => str }}># 中文</Markdown>;

// or

compiler('# 中文', { slugify: str => str });

// renders:

<h1 id="中文">中文</h1>

options.namedCodesToUnicode

By default only a couple of named html codes are converted to unicode characters:

  • & (&amp;)
  • ' (&apos;)
  • > (&gt;)
  • < (&lt;)
  • (&nbsp;)
  • " (&quot;)

Some projects require to extend this map of named codes and unicode characters. To customize this list with additional html codes pass the option namedCodesToUnicode as object with the code names needed as in the example below:

<Markdown options={{ namedCodesToUnicode: {
    le: '\u2264',
    ge: '\u2265',
} }}>This text is &le; than this text.</Markdown>;

// or

compiler('This text is &le; than this text.', namedCodesToUnicode: {
    le: '\u2264',
    ge: '\u2265',
});

// renders:

<p>This text is ≤ than this text.</p>

options.disableParsingRawHTML

By default, raw HTML is parsed to JSX. This behavior can be disabled with this option.

<Markdown options={{ disableParsingRawHTML: true }}>
    This text has <span>html</span> in it but it won't be rendered
</Markdown>;

// or

compiler('This text has <span>html</span> in it but it won't be rendered', { disableParsingRawHTML: true });

// renders:

<span>This text has &lt;span&gt;html&lt;/span&gt; in it but it won't be rendered</span>

Syntax highlighting

Some syntax highlighters require you to specify the language. The language of the code fence is forwarded in the className prop of the element used for <code>:

const Code = ({className, children}) => {
  const language = className.replace("lang-", "");

  return (
    <SyntaxHighlighter language={language}>
      <code>{children}</code>
    </SyntaxHighlighter>
  );
}

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